Osmanhan Hotel Istanbul | Osmanhan Hotel

OUR ROOMS

Economic Room

Breakfast included, 24 hours reception, air conditioner, bathroom, hair dryer, LCD TV, Fax Service, Direct-dial telephone, Minibar, Free wireless internet service, Central heating, Iron/Ironing Board.
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Standart Room

Breakfast included, 24 hours reception, air conditioner, bathroom, hair dryer, LCD TV, Fax Service, Direct-dial telephone, Minibar, Free wireless internet service, Central heating, Iron/Ironing Board
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Deluxe Room

Breakfast included, 24 hours reception, air conditioner, bathroom, hair dryer, LCD TV, Fax Service, Direct-dial telephone, Minibar, Free wireless internet service, Central heating, Iron/Ironing Board
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Tours and Plans

Do you need a guide? Then feel free to ask Osmanhan Hotel.

Topkapı Palace

The Topkapı Palace (Turkish: Topkapı Sarayı;Ottoman Turkish: طوپقپو سرايىromanized: ṭopḳapu sarāyı, lit.'cannon gate palace'), or the Seraglio, is a large museum in the east of the Fatih District of Istanbul in Turkey. In the 15th and 16th centuries it served as the main residence and administrative headquarters of the Ottoman Sultans.

Construction, ordered by the Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror, began in 1459, six years after the conquest of Constantinople. Topkapı was originally called the "New Palace" (Yeni Saray or Saray-ı Cedîd-i Âmire) to distinguish it from the Old Palace (Eski Saray or Sarây-ı Atîk-i Âmire) in Beyazıt Square. It was given the  name Topkapı, meaning Cannon Gate, in the 19th century. The complex expanded over the centuries, with major renovations after the 1509 Earthquake and the 1665 fire. The palace complex consists of four main courtyards and many smaller buildings. Female members of the Sultan's family lived in the harem, and leading state officials, including the Grand Vizier, held meetings in the Imperial Council building.

Grand Bazaar

The Grand Bazaar (Turkish: Kapalıçarşı, meaning ‘Covered Market’; also Büyük Çarşı, meaning ‘Grand Market’) in Istanbul is one of the largest and oldest covered markets in the world, with 61 covered streets and over 4,000 shops on a total area of 30,700 m2,attracting between 250,000 and 400,000 visitors daily. In 2014, it was listed No.1 among the world's most-visited tourist attractions with 91,250,000 annual visitors.The Grand Bazaar at Istanbul is often regarded as one of the first shopping malls of the world.

Carpets and Rugs

A good investment - Some Turkish rugs can be a bit pricey but their supreme beauty makes them worthy of being an investment. Turkish rugs and other antique rugs are considered as highly valuable decor pieces and just like art, their value appreciates over time.

Timeless - Another benefit of Turkish rugs is that their beauty increases as they age. Since Turkish rugs are made with fine natural materials, they get brighter and become more lustrous over the years.

Turkish rugs as interior decors also do not get out of style. A Turkish rug can adapts itself no matter what the prevailing style of your home may be. It is proven to last for not only years, but decades.

Versatile - Oftentimes, Turkish rugs are perceived to be suited only for oriental, Mediterranean or traditional inspired interiors. However, it is very versatile and flexible and when it comes to design application because they are well suited for most styles, whether traditional or modern, and can serve as a complement interior decor or a focal point in a space. In addition to that, the use of these stunning works of art is not limited. 

Dolmabahçe Palace

Dolmabahçe Palace was ordered by the Empire's 31st Sultan, Abdülhamid 1, and built between the years 1843 and 1856. Previously, the Sultan and his family had lived at the Topkapı Palace, but as the medieval Topkapı was lacking in contemporary style, luxury, and comfort, as compared to the palaces of the European monarchs, Abdülmecid decided to build a new modern palace near the site of the former Beşiktaş Sahil Palace, which was demolished. Hacı Said Ağa was responsible for the construction works, while the project was realized by architects Garabet Balyan, his son Nigoğayos Balyan and Evanis Kalfa (members of the Armenian Balyan family of Ottoman court architects).

 

The palace was home to six Sultans from 1856, when it was first inhabited, up until the abolition of the Caliphate in 1924: The last royal to live here was Caliph Abdülmecid efendi. A law that went into effect on March 3, 1924, transferred the ownership of the palace to the national heritage of the new Turkish Republic. Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, the founder and first President of the Republic of Turkey, used the palace as a presidential residence during the summers and enacted some of his most important works here. Atatürk spent the last days of his medical treatment in this palace, where he died on November 10, 1938.